Noia

Ethics

17 posts in this topic

Picture this scenario:

 

You have one remaining month till your job contract runs out.

 

You know for a fact that the manager, whom you're on neutral terms with, will absolutely eat crap and suffer for a while if you left at this point of time, due to an extreme lack of manpower. Your manager's still trying to hire another poor sap to take up your spot, but no one's biting yet.

 

However, you also aren't too pleased with the company for whatever reason, and have been looking forward to moving on and finding a new environment to make your dough in.

 

 

Do you 1) pack up and go away either way, or 2) prolong your contract slightly in order to give your manager more time to lock down another filler before you quit for good?

 

 

Had an almost endless debate with my mom before we just agreed to disagree. 

Now I can't stop pondering over it.

:mellow:

 

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Well, I feel there are two sides of it, as with most things. First, it sounds like your issue is with the company and not the manager. So it sounds like its either the company that is your issue, or the order with which head office has laboured the manager with. Now consider what your doing will do to those left behind. You will force the manager and/or other staff to cover the hours you have left, whether they like it or not. So if you have no problem with the other people there, and you have no real reason for leaving other than a difference in opinion/how thing's are run, then personally, I feel one should be the bigger person and complete your contract. First, you have the ethical reasons, because a contract is just that - you have promised to do a certain term of service, and you should finish it - because in doing so, you can say to your next employer that despite certain things, you stuck with it, which shows determination and loyalty in spite of all that. But also because if your problem doesnt lie with the staff, then you're just putting nice people in a shitty situation.

 

That being said, if the manager is the direct cause of your problems, and you're not fussed about being the bigger person, then yeah. Fuck him. I've been in a similar situation, where I was asked to work until the end of the month at a nightclub I was working at, but I knew the reason I was being fired alongside 4 others was, quite simply, because we weren't attractive female staff, so all 5 of us said fuck you to the guy, on the spot. And left him unable to actually open that weekend, and he lost out on tens of thousands of pounds. So, yeah, I dunno. I think it hinges on who's at fault. But whoever's at fault, I would direct the middle finger to them, and not the people who happen to be there for the ride.

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I agree entirely with Valentine. In fact, he's said everything I wanted to say. XD

 

You'll find that 1 month is really quite short if you make the most of it. Finish up all you have to do, do some formal handing over, and basically try to make the transition for the next person as smooth as possible. After all, if the company's as sucky as you say, the next employee will have an even harder time dealing with it, and work that you suddenly left behind.

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I'd probably end up staying on, because I'm a sucker.

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That said, I stayed on in my internship even though my manager sucked, and it was a bittersweet experience. So I can understand how Aion feels. XD

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Breach of contract never looks good in the eyes of a future employer. Even if you protest that you were under less than favourable conditions it just doesn't look good. They won't look at your story from a personal level they will just see that you can't hold up to commitments and you buckle under pressure. That might not be the case but since employers will look at you objectively against other potential candidates, every little thing makes a difference. 

 

Furthermore breaking your contract burns a bridge. It can affect you getting a reference from past employers, and ultimately you never know what will happen somewhere down the line. Maintaining good or at least neutral relationships with employers is always something to hope for. Leaving after you have completed your contract will allow you to walk out with your head held high, knowing that despite everything you honoured your commitment to that company and did your time. 

 

This is what you should do from an ethical standpoint. However we are all humans with many flaws and bouts of extreme emotional collapse, and sometimes we just have to put our hands up and bail. It wouldn't be doing you any favours in the job world but equally it might not hurt you that much either, depending on the situation. Either way it might be the better choice for you emotionally. However emotions are very personal and not the best way to look at something ethically. 

 

Oh, yeah and Death! I hate milk and other such things that prove i'm staying in character...

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I don't think he's talking about a breach of contract and leaving early. He's probably referring to leaving as soon as the end date of your contract is here, instead of waiting a few more days/weeks/months so the manager can find a replacement.

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I'd probably end up staying on, because I'm a sucker.

Yes, that does sound like what Drawfag would do. XD

 

I think that if I were you I'd definitely complete my contract first. Because completing a contract is not about your manager, or about your company. It's about how trustworthy you are as a person. Unless both you and the company says they are alright with you leaving, I think that you should stay at least until the contract ends.

 

What happens after that? It should be left up to your personal discretion. It's pretty clear that if you stay on, you'll be doing the manager a favor. If you choose to leave, it's perfectly valid for you to do so, and although the manager will be left swamped with work, that's how life works I guess. There are times where you just have to grit your teeth and bear with the work. So ultimately, it boils down to your decision: Do you want to help the manager? Because both leaving and staying on are valid choices, in my opinion.

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Assuming contract has been completed you owe the company nothing and so ultimately this comes down to whether you want to do someone a favour or not. 

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If it's about what happens after you've completed the contract then well, don't think about it first. Maybe in that month your manager will have found someone new! ^^

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Ye, no breach of contract in my scenario.

You can either complete that 1 remaining month and go away, or extend the contract a little due to the manager's plight.

 

 

 

Assuming contract has been completed you owe the company nothing and so ultimately this comes down to whether you want to do someone a favour or not. 

It pretty much boils down to this, yea.

 

I'd stay, and have stayed in response to such situations too, purely out of fear of bad karma. I don't wanna be a manager one day and end up having people run out on me when I'm in a pinch too.  But my mother said that's a loser's way of thinking. Though I can see where she's coming from.

 

 

Almost feels like people with softer personalities are gonna get shredded to pieces in this world. I:

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In the end you have to decide how much it will detriment you. If it will affect your future employment I'd say you have to do what's right for you. 

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Aye mate, as people have said, do what's right for you. If it won't detriment you, pick that choice. At the end of the day, if you have a month to go, and your manager wants you to stay on for more than that, they don't really have a leg to stand on. A month to find a replacement isn't hard, in fact its masses of time. Most people get 2 weeks notice either way, so a month should be plenty of time for the management to find a replacement in that time, assuming they're doing their job. If it were me, i'd finish my normal time there and walk. I wouldn't stay for longer just because the manager couldnt find a replacement in a month. That's tons of time. 

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I don't know where you're from and that could make the difference in what I'm about to say.

In my experience to a business you are just a tool. You owe them no loyalties beyond what they pay you for. So if it is at your advantage to hang around, do so, if not leave. A company will drop you like a rock if you are not beneficial to them, so why should you treat them any differently? This of course is coming from someone who is mean and had no issues finding another job just after my company had lost an employee because they wouldn't give me my raise that I believe I should receive every year.

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However, you also aren't too pleased with the company for whatever reason, and have been looking forward to moving on and finding a new environment to make your dough in.

 

 

i don't want to pry, but are the reasons you're displeased with your company things that you are owed from them, that you haven't received? I mean things like, lack of professionalism, disrespect of their employees, etc. Or are they more protocol things? Like "I know this company would run better if they did this thing instead of this other thing that they do, and it's annoying that I have to do things inefficiently"? I ask because if it is the former, your manager's responsibility would be to be the liaison between you and the company, and make good on whatever promises were made. I think if it's a protocol thing, that your manager has little control over, I would stick it out for a little while longer, maybe a week or two at most. Otherwise, I would leave at the end of your contract. 

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Really depends on how awful your situation is there. If you feel like you can't stick it out and you don't really need them for a reference, go ahead and leave. If you can bite the bullet for the remainder of your contract and you know it will pay off by having a good reference (or if you ever needed to contract through them again), stay. That's my opinion anyway.

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It's not really a real situation I'm going through right now, fortunately.  :lol:

But I've experienced similar incidents before.

 

We only started talking about it because I've started to reject the idea of committing myself to full time jobs. Left almost all my older companies on a slightly sour note because they simply weren't ready to let us go yet. Lots of guilt tripping and pity parties. Ended up prolonging my already somewhat unhappy stay in the companies. I dunno if I'm stupid/ gullible for rolling with all these BS, but all these experiences did ultimately pile up and give me a bad impression of 'career jobs'.

 

Part timers are always held at a way lower standard in the workplace anyway, and their duties are small enough to not make a huge difference even if they left with a one day notice. The pay's actually on par with my full time jobs, but I'll miss out on bonuses/ staff benefits/ paid leaves/ whatever other stuff full timers get. And I'd have to job hop often.

 

I've an opportunity to potentially convert a part time opening into a full time one, but I've been holding back due to said concerns. Mother can't understand why I'm not pushing for full time stints, so I cooked that scenario up for her to react to. She ended up picking the 'pack up and go' option either way.  -_-  

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